ciapannaphoto

photography by alessandro ciapanna

Posts tagged ‘monochrome’

La Boca, Argentina

Hello again, fellow bloggers!

Been busy juggling several projects at the same time for the last year or so. Overwhelmed, nearly. So, this post is pretty much to see if i can figure out how to wrap my head around the revamped wordpress interface.

The pictures are from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Specifically, the city-within-a-city that is La Boca, one of the prettiest and most brightly colored urban spaces to be seen anywhere in the world. Where better to take photographs in monochrome?

The captions refer to the pic above them.

 

 

_DSC9694_arg_ba_boca_kid_bike_court_1000px

Murals, murals everywhere…

_DSC9685_arg_ba_boca_mural_lady_1000px

You always know it, when you’re in La Boca.

_DSC9671_arg_ba_boca_man_bike_1000px

All things get done at a more relaxed pace here.

_DSC9676_arg_ba_boca_maradona_mural_kid_bike_1000px

National, international and, crucially, local hero; former footballer Maradona.

The large iron grills are to keep pedestians off the train tracks.

_DSC9687_arg_ba_boca_tourist_mural_1000px

Artist’s home? Nope: bicycle repair shop.

_DSC9669_arg_ba_boca_catanzaro_vende_1000px

The Italian presence is particularly self-evident, in gritty but charming La Boca.

All photographs taken february 2016 with a full-frame dslr.

Hope you enjoyed!

Alessandro Ciapanna

ROME – let’s look again

Ok – new camera. Second hand, but like new. Fixed focal length 50mm lens. And one city-sized playground to try it all out.

 

 

 

 

So i point the camera in a Roman piazza. Just to kind of see if it really is as sharp as they say. And then i zoom in on the people in the background. Yes, it really is quite sharp: one disgruntled gentleman at the bar table is easy to recognize: Rino Barillari, the once-famous paparazzo...

So i point the camera in a Roman piazza. Just to kind of see if it really is as sharp as they say. And then i zoom in on the people in the background. Yes, it really is quite sharp: one disgruntled gentleman at the bar table is easy to recognize: Rino Barillari, the once-famous paparazzo…

 

 

 

 

They are big, they are beautiful, and they are increasingly bold. This seagull allowed me within maybe 50 centimeters without flinching.

They are big, they are beautiful, and they are increasingly bold. This seagull allowed me within maybe 50 centimeters without flinching.

 

 

 

 

It's not completely legal, but it is also absolutely irresistible, especially when the rest of the city is torching under a relentless summer sun.

It’s not completely legal, but it is also absolutely irresistible, especially when the rest of the city is torching under a relentless summer sun.

 

 

 

 

A priest, a nun and an elegant tattroed lady: welcome to Rome, 2015.

A priest, a nun and an elegant tattooed lady: welcome to Rome, 2015.

 

 

 

 

Antique shop. The statue represents a Stones fan about to process a Betles record...

Antique shop. The statue represents a Stones fan about to process a Beatles record…

 

 

 

 

Wow, a cow! Now: how?

Wow, a cow! Now: how?

 

 

 

 

Have i mentioned how pleased i am with my new camera? This was taken at full aperture (f/1.4) at 1600 iso. Image quality? Impeccable.

Have i mentioned how pleased i am with my new camera? This was taken at full aperture (f/1.4) at 1600 iso. Image quality? Impeccable.

 

 

So, as you see, some things never really change in Rome. But with a new camera, it’s great fun to take on old subjects anew. Thanks for the visit.

Hope you enjoyed,

Alessandro Ciapanna

EX VOTO – Rome gives thanks

When the situation is absolutely hopeless, when all the doctors agree that there is absolutely no chance of ever reganing full and proper health, not all is lost. You can pray. But not just to any saint or god or deity. You must pray to Mary, the mother of Jesus. Sometimes, the faithful know, she will grant a miracle. And when she does, you must thank her.

 

 

 

 

 

Top right, street art. Main piece, place name. The rest: thank you notes carved in stone.

Top right, street art. Main piece, place name. The rest: thank you notes carved in stone.

 

 

 

 

The one to thank, times two.

The one to thank, times two.

 

 

 

 

Many cars, but precious few passers-by: five people in about twenty miinutes.

Many cars, but precious few passers-by: five people in about twenty miinutes.

 

 

 

 

One of Rome's many "nasoni" provides cold drinking water - good for people, great for flowers.

One of Rome’s many “nasoni” provides cold drinking water – good for people, great for flowers.

 

 

 

 

A keychain, a few silk flowers.

A keychain, a few silk flowers.

 

 

 

 

The plaques that fall are stacked and left in peace.

The plaques that fall are stacked and left in peace.

 

 

 

 

Some, as this larger one, is nothing short of a true work of art.

Some, as this larger one, is nothing short of a true work of art.

 

 

 

 

Another much revered figure - and documented dispenser of miracles - is Padre Pio.

Another much revered figure – and documented dispenser of miracles – is Padre Pio.

 

 

 

 

This one dates back to the '60s...

This one dates back to the ’60s…

 

 

 

 

... and this one even farther back.

… and this one even farther back.

 

 

 

 

This one is unusual: after giving thanks, F.R. apologises for the delay...

This one is unusual: after giving thanks, F.R. apologises for the delay…

 

 

 

 

 

These little plaques are attached to an old wall in a corner of Largo Preneste, in Rome. There, next to two portraits of the Madonna, people affix their “ex voto”, also referred to as “p.g.r.”, or “per grazia ricevuta”. Roughly, for having been graced. Each and every one of these plaques is testimony to a miracle, large or small. But usually huge.

 

Most are little rectangles affixed with old rusty nails. Some are heart-shaped. Some are in Latin, some in Spanish, most in Italian. Some have small gifts – a keychain, a small toy. Some have a small photograph. Some a note tucked behind a corner. Many plaques have fallen. They remain, respected, neatly stacked and then touched no more, at the foot of the wall.

 

The flowers to the Madonna are very well tended to. A “nasone” (big nose, as Romans nickname their drinking fountains) is handily nearby. I find these public yet discreet displays of affection truly touching.

 

Also, i wanted a very static subject to test out my new camera. Used, actually, but in very good shape. And it’s new to me!

 

Hope you enjoyed.

Alessandro Ciapanna